Cannabinoid receptor-mediated disruption of sensory gating and neural oscillations: A translational study in rats and humans.

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Cannabinoid receptor-mediated disruption of sensory gating and neural oscillations: A translational study in rats and humans.

Neuropharmacology. 2018 Mar 28;:

Authors: Skosnik PD, Hajós M, Cortes-Briones JA, Edwards CR, Pittman BP, Hoffmann WE, Sewell AR, D’Souza DC, Ranganathan M

Abstract
Cannabis use has been associated with altered sensory gating and neural oscillations. However, it is unclear which constituent in cannabis is responsible for these effects, or whether these are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) mediated. Therefore, the present study in humans and rats examined whether cannabinoid administration would disrupt sensory gating and evoked oscillations utilizing electroencephalography (EEG) and local field potentials (LFPs), respectively. Human subjects (n = 15) completed four test days during which they received intravenous delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD), Δ9-THC + CBD, or placebo. Subjects engaged in a dual-click paradigm, and outcome measures included P50 gating ratio (S2/S1) and evoked power to S1 and S2. In order to examine CB1R specificity, rats (n = 6) were administered the CB1R agonist CP-55940, CP-55940+AM-251 (a CB1R antagonist), or vehicle using the same paradigm. LFPs were recorded from CA3 and entorhinal cortex. Both Δ9-THC (p < 0.007) and Δ9-THC + CBD (p < 0.004) disrupted P50 gating ratio compared to placebo, while CBD alone had no effect. Δ9-THC (p < 0.048) and Δ9-THC + CBD (p < 0.035) decreased S1 evoked theta power, and in the Δ9-THC condition, S1 theta negatively correlated with gating ratios (r = -0.629, p < 0.012 (p < 0.048 adjusted)). In rats, CP-55940 disrupted gating in both brain regions (p < 0.0001), and this was reversed by AM-251. Further, CP-55940 decreased evoked theta (p < 0.0077) and gamma (p < 0.011) power to S1, which was partially blocked by AM-251. These convergent human/animal data suggest that CB1R agonists disrupt sensory gating by altering neural oscillations in the theta-band. Moreover, this suggests that the endocannabinoid system mediates theta oscillations relevant to perception and cognition.

PMID: 29604295 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]


Source: Estudios sobre Cannabidiol (CBD)

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